12 Social Media Apps All Parents Should Know Series-Day 3

12SMapp_3Welcome to Day 3 of the 12 Social Media Apps All Parents Should Know Series.

This week we’re talking about 12 social media apps popular with teens.
Some of these might be familiar to you. Others might be new to you.

Yesterday we discussed Snapchat, Tumblr and Google+. If you missed that post you can view it here.

Today we’re talking about Vine, Wanelo and Kik

I’ll  continue to introduce 3 social media platforms each day this week. On Friday, I’ll wrap up the week by posting all 12 social media apps for you. I also post my thoughts social media apps we’re using in my home. This list isn’t meant to steer you away from these apps. Instead, I want to give you insight into them so you can work through the pros and cons of each, and set up the privacy settings that work for your family. My hope is we’ll end the week as parents who are a bit more informed.

Let’s jump in today!

[clear]

 

 

VineVine

Vine is a social media app that lets users post and watch looping six-second video clips. Vine is owned by Twitter.  The community of people using Vine is diverse. So you’ll find videos that are creative, funny, and sometimes thought-provoking.

What Teens Say

Videos are as diverse as the people creating them. You’ll find stop-motion clips of puzzles doing and undoing themselves. Then, you can find a six-second skits showing how a teen wakes up on a school day vs. a day during summer. Teens often use Vine to create and share silly videos of themselves or their friends and family.

What Parents Should Know

Vine is full of inappropriate videos. With just a few minutes of searching, you can easily find videos of half-dressed and full frontal nudity videos. There’s a lot of funny, clever videos on Vine. But, it doesn’t appear they’re trying to make the app appropriate for kids or add a way to set filters for content.

There are significant privacy concerns. The videos you post, the accounts you follow, and the comments you make on videos are all public by default. You can adjust your privacy settings so only followers will see videos you post and you approve new followers.

[clear]

 

 

WaneloWanelo

Wanelo-Want, Need, Love-combines shopping, fashion blogging, and social networking all in one. It’s popular among teens because it allows them to discover, share, and buy products they like.

What Teens Say

Teens keep up with the latest styles by browsing Wanelo’s “trending” feed, which displays the most popular items across the site. They can also cultivate their own style by using the “My Feed” function to display content from the users, brands, and stores they follow.

What Parents Should Know

If you like it, you can buy it. This means users can purchase almost anything they see on Wanelo by clicking through to the original site for any product.

Brand names are prominent. Users are required to follow at least three “stores” when they register and at least three “people.”

NOTE: I was able to set up my account without having to select 3 stores or 3 people to follow. It does continue to crash on my phone. I did go through a list of items and selected if I liked them or not. I was easily able to stop the process. I would love to hear how the set up worked for others to see if this is a change for Walone.

Many people using Walone are just everyday people, but there are also publications like Seventeen Magazine and product brands.

There’s plenty of mature clothing. This could lead to arguments over what your teen can and can’t wear.

[clear]

 

 

KikKik

Kik Messenger is an app-based alternative to standard texting that teens use for social networking. It’s free to use but has lots of ads.

What Teens Say

It’s fast and has no message limits, character limits, or fees if you just use the basic features. Teens aren’t worried about limits do Kik is a bit more worry free and fun for them.

What Parents Should Know

Kik’s ability to link to other Kik-enabled apps within itself is a way to drive purchases from users for developers. The app also encourages new users to invite everyone in their phone’s address book to join Kik, since users can only message those who also have the app.

You’ll want to talk to your teens about sharing with strangers. An app named OinkText, linked to Kik, allows communication with strangers who share their Kik usernames to find people to chat with. There’s also a Kik community blog where users can submit photos of themselves and screenshots of messages to with others.

2 Comments

  1. […] Yesterday we discussed Vine, Wanelo and Kik. If you missed that post you can view it here. […]

  2. Live Streaming Teens - Leah Nieman on February 18, 2016 at 5:39 pm

    […] Day 3 […]

Leave a Comment